New Avocado Packaging Technology

ROP specialises in extending fruit and vegetable shelf life during transport, storage and, as a  retail packaging, at the point of sale. ROP has recently unveiled a new packaging system in collaboration with the Volcani Centre Agricultural Research Organisation's storage laboratory at Kiryat Shemona and other commercial enterprises. The new packaging for avocado, lychee and persimmon possesses unique properties that preserve the fruit’s freshness and nutritional values, reduces costs and is environmentally friendly. Avocados are picked before they ripen but should ideally reach the consumer's table at the correct softness for eating.




Current agricultural technology includes cold storage and sometimes 1-MCP or similar treatment to delay ripening and extend storage time.

Overtreatment can cause the fruit to never ripen. Many of us have bought avocados that have rotted without ever ripening.

This is what the industry has been capable of thus far.
ROP packaging brings new tidings to the market.

1st Breakthrough: ROP has developed a technology that uses controlled levels of gas and humidity that obviates the need to use 1-MCP or similar substances and extends storage life beyond current standards without it.

2nd Breakthrough: Currently, avocado's ready to eat stage is very brief resulting in it either being sold unripe or having a short shelf life.

ROP's new technology has doubled its ready to eat stage to up to six days or more.
Furthermore in this ROP solution – Since ready to eat Avocado is so tricky, customers tend to feel the fruit, which bruises it. Hence, many retailers have started to pack ready to eat Avocado in trays. As Mr. Gal Wallach, ROP VP Sales and Marketing relates, when fruit is put on the shelves fresh, the special protective trays will no longer be necessary because customers will learn that the fruit is ready to eat and need not be handled. This will prevent damage resulting by waste as well as will economize on packaging.

So far we have addressed quality and readiness, which greatly affects costs, since supermarkets are naturally reluctant to throw fruit away.
This new development could greatly affect global consumption, since avocado is one of the most abundant fruits in the world – it is big business. In the United States, consumption in 2014 exceeded 4 billion avocados, four times the number eaten at the start of the new millennium.